DDoS Attacks Are Becoming More Frequent

It used to be technically difficult to launch a DDoS attack, but now it’s possible to rent a botnet of tens or even hundreds of thousands of infected or “zombie” machines relatively cheaply and use these zombies to launch an attack. And as the Internet develops, home or office computers that have become zombies can make use of increasingly high bandwidth Internet connections.

So how can you stop a DDoS attack?

Identify a DDoS Attack Early

If you run your own servers, then you need to be able to identify when you are under attack. That’s because the sooner you can establish that problems with your website are due to a DDoS attack, the sooner you can start to do something about it.

To be in a position to do this, it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with your typical inbound traffic profile; the more you know about what your normal traffic looks like, the easier it is to spot when its profile changes. Most DDoS attacks start as sharp spikes in traffic, and it’s helpful to be able to tell the difference between a sudden surge of legitimate visitors and the start of a DDoS attack.

It’s also a good idea to nominate a DDoS leader in your company who is responsible for acting should you come under attack.

Overprovision Bandwidth

It generally makes sense to have more bandwidth available to your Web server than you ever think you are likely to need. That way, you can accommodate sudden and unexpected surges in traffic that could be a result of an advertising campaign, a special offer or even a mention of your company in the media.

Even if you overprovision by 100 percent — or 500 percent — that likely won’t stop a DDoS attack. But it may give you a few extra minutes to act before your resources are overwhelmed.

Defend at Network Perimeter (if You Run Your Own Web Server)

There are a few technical measures that can be taken to partially mitigate the effect of an attack — especially in the first minutes — and some of these are quite simple. For example, you can:

  • rate limit your router to prevent your Web server being overwhelmed
  • add filters to tell your router to drop packets from obvious sources of attack
  • timeout half-open connections more aggressively
  • drop spoofed or malformed packages
  • set lower SYN, ICMP, and UDP flood drop thresholds

But the truth is that while these steps have been effective in the past, DDoS attacks are now usually too large for these measures to have any significant effect. Again, the most you can hope for is that they will buy you a little time as a DDoS attack ramps up.

Call Your ISP or Hosting Provider

The next step is to call your ISP (or hosting provider if you do not host your own Web server), tell them you are under attack and ask for help. Keep emergency contacts for your ISP or hosting provider readily available, so you can do this quickly. Depending on the strength of the attack, the ISP or hoster may already have detected it, or they may themselves start to be overwhelmed by the attack.

You stand a better chance of withstanding a DDoS attack if your Web server is located in a hosting center than if you run it yourself. That’s because its data center will likely have far higher bandwidth links and higher capacity routers than your company has itself, and its staff will probably have more experience dealing with attacks. Having your Web server located with a hoster will also keep DDoS traffic aimed at your Web server off your corporate LAN, so at least that part of your business — including email and possibly voice over IP services — should operate normally during an attack.

If a DDoS attack is large enough, the first thing a hosting company or ISP is likely to do is “null route” your traffic — which results in packets destined for your Web server being dropped before they arrive.

If that was the end of the story, then the DDoS attack would be successful. To get the website back online, your ISP or hosting company may divert traffic to a “scrubber” where the malicious packets can be removed before the legitimate ones are be sent on to your Web server

Do have a DDoS plan in place with your ISP or hoster so that it can begin mitigation or divert your traffic to a mitigation specialist with the minimum delay.

Information in this post was taken from google

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